Toward a more perfect joining

When I made the second of what is destined to be at least seven of Jenna Wingate’s stash-busters hat, I noticed that there was an annoying (to me) line that delineated the point at which every round had been joined.

This is a common problem for crocheters when making a hat that is not worked in a continuous spiral and the line of small gaps can be seen here in this photo as it traverses from the mid-center up toward the left:

striped crochet hat, crochetbug, crochet stripes, crochet beanie, textured crochet, scrap buster, use what you have, yarn stash
My second scrap buster hat effort with the ends woven in and trimmed

I love the hat, but I am not as enamored of my joining efforts and while ruminating over this dissatisfaction, I recalled that at some point I had made a hat that was also not worked in a spiral, but which did not have a join that was so glaring.

After much thinking, I was pretty sure I remembered how it was done, and tested it out on my third stash-busters effort.

Using Jenna Wingate’s brilliant pattern and a palette of the best and brightest Red Heart Super Saver colors in my stash, I got to work.

Here is an overview of my progress at the end of the end of the day:

striped crochet hat, crochetbug, crochet stripes, crochet beanie, textured crochet, scrap buster, use what you have, yarn stash
My progress so far

The joining (while still visible) is not as pronounced as it was in my previous effort.

Here is how I did it.

After finishing the last stitch of the current round:

striped crochet hat, crochetbug, crochet stripes, crochet beanie, textured crochet, scrap buster, use what you have, yarn stash
Complete last hdc of current round

I inserted the hook through both loops of the first stitch of the same round, and grabbed the color I would be using in the the new round:

striped crochet hat, crochetbug, crochet stripes, crochet beanie, textured crochet, scrap buster, use what you have, yarn stash
Insert hook through both loops of the first hdc of the round and grab the new color of yarn for the next round

then pulled it through to the front, as if completing a slip stitch:

striped crochet hat, crochetbug, crochet stripes, crochet beanie, textured crochet, scrap buster, use what you have, yarn stash
Pull through as if to finish a slip stitch

Next, I made one chain with the new color:

striped crochet hat, crochetbug, crochet stripes, crochet beanie, textured crochet, scrap buster, use what you have, yarn stash
Chain 1

then yarned over in the new color (in preparation make an hdc), and inserted the hook into the second stitch of the previous round.

striped crochet hat, crochetbug, crochet stripes, crochet beanie, textured crochet, scrap buster, use what you have, yarn stash
Yarn over and insert hook into the 2nd stitch of the previous round

Then, I completed the first hdc of the new round in the second hdc of the previous round:

striped crochet hat, crochetbug, crochet stripes, crochet beanie, textured crochet, scrap buster, use what you have, yarn stash
Complete working the first hdc in the new color

I’m going to have a lot of opportunity to practice and perfect this technique, as a cousin of mine getting together gifts for a family that needs help during these holidays, and I asked if I could help with her effort. She said yes, and I want to make sure that I give the people who will be receiving these hats my very best work.

Too often what is given as charity is the stuff in our lives that we no longer want or have use for.

A real present is when we offer that best that we have to give, and I am bound and determined to make these hats something that anyone would like to have.

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2 thoughts on “Toward a more perfect joining

  1. That’s how I’ve always switched colors before. In the hat I’m making now the pattern called for you to ch2 then dc in the same stitch, not counting the ch as a stitch. This helps the ‘hole’ you get anyway.
    Why would your seam travel like that?

  2. Hi Leslie

    Love the hats – but the cookieghan is the star!

    I make lots of stripy items, and my way of avoiding the obvious seam (after a bit of practice) is just to finish off completely each round, then start in a different spot every new round.

    What I do is – when starting a new round – simply slip stitch into a spot removed a few stitches from where I finished the round before, do as many chain as needed, then keep crocheting on as required, also going over the ends from both current and just finished rounds to save a bit of trimming later and make the texture tidier.

    I can seriously say that you’d never know where 99 per cent of the stripes I make start and finish.

    Good luck with it!

    Lynda

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