The project basket

Today I had trouble deciding which of the many unfinished projects I would work on, so instead of settling on any one unfinished project, I worked my way through several grabbing something from a laundry basket that is filled with assorted projects in various states of undoneness.

The first thing I did of a crochet nature was to finishing joining a row of the small squares that form the row that is the second from the top in this photo. I then joined that row the panel I was working on for my “Flight of Fancy” bag, and added another row to boot:

small crochet squares crochet bag
I add two more rows to one panel of the Flight of Fancy crochet bag

With that done, I turned to the former laundry basket that has become a repository for unfinished objects to see what would claim my attention next, and what caught my eye was a square from a crochet-a-long I am involved with.

Last week, as part of my effort to not start any new projects, I finished work on Square 86 from Jean Leinhauser’s 101 Crochet Squares:

crochet flower crochet poinsettia
Crochet Square 86

At the time I had decided to omit the final round of the square and design a companion square that could be used.

Today as I was sorting through the projects in the basket, I came across the recently completed Square 86, and before I put it in a designated cubby in my crochet empire where I have all of the other squares I have completed from the 101 Crochet Squares crochet-a-long, I decided to try making the companion square while the particulars of the original squarewere still relatively fresh in my mind. After four efforts that didn’t work, I finished this one, which, to my mind, did work:

companion crochet square
Companion crochet square for Jean Leinhauser’s Square 86

and here is a photo of Square 86 with it’s newly designed companion square:

crochet flower square and plain crochet square
The companion crochet square with Square 86

Happy to have gotten the details of the companion square worked out, I found that it was time to get my son to his dental appointment. I filled my purse with things to do.

One thing I desperately wanted to get done was to attach the handles of Merri Purdy’s Little Red Felted Make-Up Bag, as I was concerned that the straps would get separated from the bag, and I would be forced to redo them and improvise.

So, rather than felt the straps and the bag separately, and then cut slits in the bag through which I would then attach the straps by knotting the ends, I decided to push the ends of the straps through the space between stitches and knot the ends before felting the bag.

Here is how it looked with the straps secured to the bag before felting:

crochet purse ready to felt
A small currant crochet bag ready to be felted

Resting easier knowing that the handles and the bag would no longer have the opportunity to go their separate ways, I then took the first steps needed to answer a reader’s question about how much black yarn to buy if one were going to make a granny square afghan like the one on the sofa in Roseanne Barr’s long running sitcom, “Roseanne.” Known by some in crochetland as “that afghan.”

I had written a blog post about “that afghan” many moons ago, but I had never taken the time to figure out how much black yarn that would entail, so while I waited for my son’s appointment to end, I got out an H hook and set to work:

four round granny square
A four-round granny square

Now that I have a four-round granny square, I can work the fifth round, frog it, and then measure the length of yarn used and multiply it to get a general idea of how much yarn will be needed for my reader to make her iconic afghan.

As for the granny square pictured above, I finished it just as my son’s appointment ended, and while it in many ways felt (as it almost always does) that I could have gotten more done, I expect that by the end of the week, I should be able to remove a couple of things from the basket and count them as done.

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