Golden oldies

I recently got a message from the crocheter known as Babukatorium.

I had commented on several crochet mandala rings that she had designed and which I found delightful. In her response, she asked me the following question:

What is the thing that you, Leslie, hate the most about the whole creating process?

When I first read the message, I had been reading it on my phone. Outside of texts, I don’t normally like to write responses on my phone because the predictive text feature often says things I never intended to say. I find the process too frustrating, so while I found the questing interesting, I decided I would write my response when I got home and had my computer handy.

By the time I got home, I had forgotten that I wanted to respond to the message, and over the course of several days whenever the time was wrong, my mind would wander back to the question she had posed, and I would think, “I really need to write a response.”

One advantage of not responding immediately was that unanswered question was still in my consciousness, and as I have continued my battle with entropy and worked to bring order to my empire, an answer began to emerge.

I had been looking in my crochet empire which doubles as a guest room, and came across this “roll” of granny squares:

crochetbug, crochet squares, granny squares, crochet blanket, crochet border
A roll of crochet squares from a project I have yet to finish

Originally made to be the “frame” for my not yet completed 2015/2016/2017 State Fair project:

crochetbug, crazy quilt crochet, embroidery on crochet, narrative crochet, crochet panels, crochet rectangles, crochet squares, crochet blanket, crochet afghan, crochet throw
The outer panels of the narrative afghan

the pieces had not worked as I had hoped they would, and I had been forced to abandon them — and that, I realized is my least favorite element of designing — the knowledge that I will do something that will not work, and I will be left with pieces that cannot be used.

Unless you find another project you can use them in.

With a roll of two-round granny squares and a bag filled with even more two-round granny squares and the monochrome textured crochet rose motifs, I got to work.

First I made this nine-patch seven-inch square:

crochetbug, crochet roses, crochet flowers, crochet squares, granny squares, crochet blanket, crochet border
A nine-patch seven-inch crochet square made from an abandoned element of the project

Buoyed by the fact that nine squares had been transformed from purposelessness to purpose, I got to work coming up with a five-inch crochet square using the same crochet building blocks, and what I devised was this:

crochetbug, crochet squares, granny squares, crochet blanket, crochet border
A rehabbed five-inch crochet square made from the previously unpurposed squares

I liked it well enough, but thought it needed a little something, so in short order, I made this six-petal crochet flower:

crochetbug, crochet squares, granny squares, crochet blanket, crochet border
The same crochet square with a crochet flower to add a decorative element

Which covered the gap in the center and added a coordinating pop of color to the ever-so-modest slip stitch border.

Using the same technique, I made five more rehabbed crochet squares to go with the first:

crochetbug, crochet squares, granny squares, crochet blanket, crochet border
Twenty-four crochet squares rehabbed into six five-inch crochet squares

As well as five more crochet flowers:

crochetbug, crochet squares, granny squares, crochet blanket, crochet border
Six crochet flowers to decorate some five-inch crochet squares

To add just the right decorative element to the squares:

crochetbug, crochet squares, granny squares, crochet blanket, crochet border
Six almost completed five-inch crochet squares

Giving this previously purposeless squares a revised and purposeful life makes me feel a lot better about the time and resources that had previously felt squandered, and with many more bits and pieces around my house, I will work to transform them the only way I can: one stitch at a time.

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